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Are you a Wolf Hunter?

thepolicenews.net | Lt. Col. Dave Grossman often claims that society can be divided into three groups: Sheep, Sheepdogs, and Wolves. When he uses the term sheep, he does not mean it in a negative way, just that most people are kind, caring people with no capacity for violence toward their fellow man. Wolves are the bad element of society, those that prey on the innocent, the weak, and those who cannot, will not, or do not know how to defend themselves. In Lt. Col. Grossman's model, the Sheepdogs are the element of society that are those special people with both a capacity for violence, and a deep level of love and care for those they protect. Sheepdogs are not limited to police. They are also military personnel, and even citizens willing to intercede in a crisis. 

A wolfhunter, though, is specific element of the sheepdog world. They don't just react to crises, they hunt down those that create them. They keep their nose high to the breeze, their eyes shifting and scanning, and their ears pricked, always searching. A wolfhunter yearns for the day when his (or her) skill can be summoned to protect the flock. That is not to say that they wish to kill. They are not wolves. They do not enjoy killing, but rather view it as a possible necessity in their ultimate goal of protecting their flock. There is no requirement to kill to be considered a wolfhunter, just an understanding that you may be called to do risk your life or take another's in defense of the innocent.  You must always be ready if the wolf appears at the door. There is a high level of commitment, determination, and willingness to place yourself in harm's way to protect the flock that makes you a wolfhunter. Simply pinning a badge on your chest will not suffice. It is a title that is earned in the deepest parts of your soul through sweat and blood, not given by a Facebook page.  

Protect the flock.  Hunt the wolf.

Last modified onSaturday, 06 August 2016 17:16
John Galt

John Galt is our fearless leader.   Before founding The Galt Report, Galt worked as an engineer for the Twentieth Century Motor Company, where he secretly invented a generator of usable electric energy from ambient static electricity, but abandoned his prototype, and his employment, when dissatisfied by an easily corrupted novel system of payment. This prototype was found by Dagny Taggart and Hank Rearden. Galt himself remains concealed in a remote valley, where he unites the most skillful inventors and business leaders under his leadership.

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